The Wellington Cobbler and the Wrekin Giant

The Wellington Cobbler and the Wrekin Giant
The Wellington Cobbler and the Wrekin Giant by Dave Weston, illustrated by Toni Sian Williams

The ancient borderlands of Shropshire have produced many intriguing myths and legends. Myths are stories that have been passed down for many years before before written down. This is the story of how the Wrekin hill might have been formed. It may also explain how the phrase 'going all around the Wrekin' came about.

ISBN 978-0-9926031-1-3 4.99 24pp publication September 2013

The Wellington Cobbler and the Wrekin Giant is on BBC Radio Shropshire. Click here to listen.

Wrekin Giant book launch Toni Sian Williams (illustrator), Dave Weston (author) and Ina Taylor of Ellingham Press at the Wrekin Giant book launch


Wrekin Giant book launch The models for the main characters from The Wellington Cobbler and the Wrekin Giant



LOCAL HISTORY BOOK ENJOYS GIANT SUCCESS

A book about the Wrekin is topping the best-seller charts at Waterstones in Telford this Christmas beating the likes of Sir Alex Ferguson, David Walliams and Sir David Jason.

The Wellington Cobbler and the Wrekin Giant, written by Dave Weston with illustrations from Toni Sian Williams, has been flying off the shelves at the Telford Shopping Centre since publication in September.

It's proving to be the perfect stocking filler with Telford's shoppers and looks set to be the Christmas No 1 at Waterstones in the town this year.

The ancient borderlands of Shropshire have produced many intriguing myths and legends. The Wellington Cobbler and the Wrekin Giant tells the story of how the Wrekin hill may have been formed and also explains how the phrase "going all around the Wrekin" came about.

Janice Hume, bookshop manager at Waterstones in Telford, said: "The response to The Wellington Cobbler and the Wrekin Giant has been phenomenal. Our customers love it and if our sales are anything to go by it looks like everyone in Telford will have a copy in their stocking on Christmas morning."

Shropshire Star, 9th December 2013



Review from Shropshire magazine

Myths and legends? We love 'em! And children, of course, love them all.

Certainly, the Shropshire borderlands have produced many intriguing myths and legends over many centuries. What's more, you can get away with delicious speculation so much more easily than if everything is pure and proven fact.

But grown-ups as well as youngsters will enjoy Dave Weston's little book with the giant hand and the mini cobbler on the cover. It is an easy one to read to tinies while the kettle's boiling and the Christmas cake is being cut for tea.

The book is delightfully illustrated by Toni Sian Williams and a real attention grabber.

So this is the story of how the Wrekin might have been formed and may also explain the phrase 'going all around the Wrekin'.

Others will have different ideas on that but, hey, the little book with its myths and legends is fun.

Review by Shirley Tart


Review from the Shropshire Star 29th November

This is one of the loveliest children's books about Shropshire that I've ever seen. Beautifully illustrated in full colour by Toni Sian Williams, it was a county legend to explain how the Wrekin might have been formed.

Grendol, the Welsh giant, who didn't like the mayor and people of Shrewsbury, carried a huge shovel of soil to dam the River Severn and flood the county town. Because it was foggy, he took a wrong turn, heading for Wellington instead of Shrewsbury. Weary and cross, he trudged on and eventually came upon a man sitting under an old oak tree near Attingham. The man was Tollenwing the Cobbler who often rested there while travelling between the two towns to carry out his trade. Tollenwing had a heavy sack of boots and shoes to mend from his Shrewsbury customers and he asked the giant why he needed to go there. Grendol told him the reason which shocked the little cobbler who saw his trade would drop without Shrewsbury folk's footwear to mend, so he lied and told the giant that the town was miles away, showing him the sackful of footwear that he pretended to have worn out walking such a long distance. Tired of carrying his heavy load of soil, the giant dumped it where he stood and went back to Wales. The heap of earth became the Wrekin. Ending with a page of real facts about the Wrekin and a character to find on each page, the delightful storybook would make a superb gift for any child to Treasure.

Review by Sally Bunn